Managing mental health- Part 4: Myths about mental conditions

Managing mental health- Part 4: Myths about mental conditions

“This disease comes with a package: Shame. When any other part of your body gets sick, you get sympathy.” – Ruby Wax

People often fail to realize the fact that mental illnesses are more common than they are perceived to be. In fact, almost everyone, irrespective of age, gender, ethnicity, etc., stand an increased risk of developing a mental illness. Hence, no demography in the world can claim to remain unaffected by the pervasiveness of mental health conditions. Read more

Managing mental health- Part 3: Inclusion of people with mental conditions in community-level care

Managing mental health- Part 3: Inclusion of people with mental conditions in community-level care

“I alone cannot change the world, but I can cast a stone across the waters to create many ripples.”

― Mother Teresa

People with any type of mental illness are often denied their basic human rights, such as right to avail treatment, rehabilitation and mental health care services. The socioeconomic discrimination and segregation from the mainstream society extend not just to the people with mental disorders, but also to their families. Read more

Managing mental health - Part 2: Tackling insensitiveness toward mental disorders

Managing mental health – Part 2: Tackling insensitiveness toward mental disorders

“It’s so common, it could be anyone. The trouble is nobody wants to talk about it. And that makes everything worse.” Ruby Wax

The culture of a society plays a crucial role in influencing the approach toward mental health disorders. This may include how individuals from a specific culture express and manifest their symptoms and cope with their disorder. Culture also influences the way support groups, such as family, community, etc., perceive the disorder and their alacrity to seek treatment for the patient. Read more

Mental health in America- Part 4: Veterans at greater suicide risk during first year of homecoming

Mental health in America- Part 4: Veterans at greater suicide risk during first year of homecoming

The aftermath of serving in a war can be witnessed among many veterans and their families in the form of emotional turmoil that can continue even after their return.The extent of their plight can also seep into their mental health,with many veterans developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and symptoms of other mental disorders. The families of those serving in the military seem to live under the shadow of stress and fear. Read more

Ways to nurturing positive mental health

Ways to nurturing positive mental health

The U.S. Department of Health & Human Services states that “mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel, and act. It also helps determine how we handle stress, relate to others, and make choices.” A person’s mental health has a direct bearing on how he/she thinks, feels and behaves, and also on how well he/she is able to meet the challenges faced in daily life and recover from setbacks. Read more